Cv Publications 2012 -15

 

January 2012 Work Bank

March David Medalla

David Hockney

Lucian Freud

April Wiltshire

May   Damien Hirst

June  Being Tracey

July   Cumbria: A County Guide

August London Festival

September Artist Recordings

October Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood

November   The Ring of Minos

December   Two Bridges

January 2013   Francesco Clemente

February  Edward Lucie-Smith

The Decline & Fall of the Avant-Garde

March  Kurt Schwitters

April Robert Rauschenberg

Chuck Close

July ,Photography and Art

John Dugger

October The Dance of Death

November  London Terminal

December Art, Criticism & Display

January 2014 Tracks 2014

July  Art, Poetry and WW1

September Les Berbères et Moi

Octoberber   Liverpool Biennal

Visiting Frieze Art Fair 2014

November  

Between Dream and Nightmare

December  Rembrandt and Turner

2015 February  The Private John Singer Sargent

March Leon Golub  Political Painting

Goya Between Two Worlds

May  David Hockney  Painting & Photography

October Through the Lens

Studies of Photographers by Marina Vizey

Fritz Wegner Archive

Ai Weiwei

At the Royal Academy

Giacometti Portraits

The National Portrait Gallery

 

 

 

 

 

 

Art . Travel . Histories . Social Studies . Studio Work

 

Cv/VAR Archive & Editions

 

‘It’s a great archive..a good book for dipping into” Susie Honeyman

Beautifully produced, legible and very readable’ Christopher Le Brun

 

 

 

 

 

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Text Box: Cv/VAR Archive 
John Latham . Stephen Willats . Rita Donagh . Vaughan Grylls . Tony Rothon . Gerald Newman . John A.Walker . Jonathan Miles

Art Forum

The Gallery London March 1976

Studio Work

Figure to Ground

Cv Publications  www.tracksdirectory.ision.co.uk

Cornwall to Crete

Painted Vistas

Chyandour

Terry Setch  Interviews-Artists Volume Two 2010

 

So Penarth Beach is the primary source, but you bring back things to the studio to move forward with the paintings.

Initially the paintings were made on the beach, the canvas was put in the sea, I let all kind of things happen to it. They could have stayed there, quite easily melding in. I set up a number of totems along the beach, the sea knocked them down and then placed them somewhere else. All that was a part of the picture that I couldn’t drag home. However, there were things I could take home, and very soon, after getting involved with what was site specific work  undertaken in the late ‘60s and early ‘70s, I wanted to set up a confrontation between the spectator and the work. I wanted to see what happened when it was taken from one place and put in another place.

Terry Setch Viewing Lavernock Point 2009, oil on canvas 170 x 216cmCourtesy of Michael Richardson Contemporary Art

David Nash  Interviews-Artists Volume Two 2010

 

How does a tree grow? Under the bark is what’s called the Cambium Layer, which is full of protein. It’s the only genuinely alive part of the tree. It grows the annual ring of new wood each year. It also maintains the bark.

Feeding from what? From the roots, water is brought up from the roots. The root has fungus on it, fungus which breaks down the minerals into something that the tree can actually digest and work with through photo-synthesis. The Cambium layer is the active bit, fed by the minerals and the light. This sapwood lifts the water. As each new layer of sapwood forms an inner ring, dies and becomes heart wood, it clogs up. It holds water, but it’s not really functioning as a lifter of water. The sapwood is the real lifter of water.

David Nash Ash Dome  2009 

charcoal on paper   Image: Jonty Wilde

Courtesy Yorkshire Sculpture Park

Mat Collishaw Insecticide 13 , 2009

C-type photo on Dibond

182.9 x 182.9 cm 72 x 72 inches

Image courtesy of the artist and Blain|Southern

Mat Collishaw  Interviews-Artists Volume Three 2011

Can we talk through this image, which is a  flattened moth wing, and set it in context?

I started doing them originally when my son was born, because we had to dry clean the flat, to make sure there were no bugs around. And I started squashing them  between little 35mm slides. I projected them on the wall, to ten or twelve feet high. Some of them had not quite died yet,  so there was a daddy long legs wriggling. The leg was like seven feet long, really quite powerful. You could see microscopic detail in there, where the body had been punctured and fluid oozed out. And when you got a nice little squash there they were very dynamic images. Then you could print that; take a little slide down to the laser printers on the corner, slip it in their machine and they’d print it. It seemed to me this was a very simple example of the photograph being an act of death: petit morte. This was that thing in the moment it was killed. And being taken from the three dimensional world that it lived in to being physically squashed onto a two dimensional plane. Then I’d blow them up and make them a lot bigger.